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Computing That Serves

Colloquium: Security and Usability Research at BYU

Date: 

Thursday, September 10, 2015 - 11:00am

Speaker: 

Kent Seamons and Daniel Zappala

Host: 

Kent Seamons and Daniel Zappala

Security and Usability Research at BYU
Thursday, September 10, 2015
11:00am 1170 TMCB

Kent Seamons and Daniel Zappala are faculty members in the BYU Computer Science Department that have recently begun to collaborate on research in security and usability. During this past year, they received a Google Faculty Research Award and a half million dollars in funding from the National Science Foundation for their work to improve website authentication on the Internet. They will present an overview of the security and usability research they conduct with their students at BYU and describe opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students to contribute to this research.

Biography: 

Kent Seamons has been a faculty member at BYU since 2000. His research interests are in usable security, privacy, authentication, identity management, and trust management. Prior to coming to BYU, he conducted research at the IBM Pittsburgh Lab where he was a co-inventor of trust negotiation. He has a PhD in Computer Science from Illinois. He has over 50 publications and more than 4,200 citations on Google Scholar. He has also received nearly 5 million dollars in funding from DARPA, NSF, NASA, and industry. He has supervised 1 PhD student and 28 MS students at BYU. He has also been awarded four patents in the areas of trust negotiation, single sign-on, and security overlays.

Daniel Zappala has been a faculty member at BYU since 2004. His research interests are in networking, security, and usability. He was previously on the faculty at the University of Oregon. He has a PhD in Computer Science from USC. His research publications have more than 3,600 citations on Google scholar. He has received nearly 2 million dollars in funding from NSF, AFRL, and DHS. He has supervised 6 PhD students and 17 MS students. Daniel develops open source software as a means of technology transfer and academic collaboration.




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